Difference between revisions of "42nd Gurkha Rifles"

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(Regimental histories)
 
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==Regimental histories==
 
==Regimental histories==
*''Britain's Brigade of Gurkhas : the 2nd K.E.O. Goorkha Rifles, the 6th Q.E.O. Gurkha Rifles, the 7th D.E.O. Gurkha Rifles and the 10th P.M.O. Gurkha Rifles''  by E.D. Smith. Originally published 1973, and reprinted 1982. Series: ''Famous regiments''.
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*''Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles. Vol.1, 1817-1919''  compiled by D.G.J. Ryan, G.C. Strahan, J.K. Jones.  1925. Available at the [[British Library]] UIN: BLL01011835772
:Available at the [[British Library]] UIN: BLL01007379549
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: ''Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles. Vol.2 1919-1948''  by H.R.K. Gibbs. 1955. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01011835773
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:[''Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles]. Vol.3, The steadfast Gurkha : historical record of 6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles, 1948-1982''  by Charles Messenger c 1985. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01011838612
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*''Britain's Brigade of Gurkhas : the 2nd K.E.O. Goorkha Rifles, the 6th Q.E.O. Gurkha Rifles, the 7th D.E.O. Gurkha Rifles and the 10th P.M.O. Gurkha Rifles''  by E.D. Smith. Originally published 1973, and reprinted 1982. Series: ''Famous regiments''. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01007379549
  
 
==First World War==
 
==First World War==

Latest revision as of 11:44, 4 December 2019

6th Gurkha Rifles

Refer to general article Gurkha Rifles

Chronology

  • 1817 raised as the Cuttack Legion
  • 1823 renamed Rangpur Light Infantry
  • 1826 became the 8th Local Light Infantry
  • 1844 became the 1st Assam Light Infantry
  • 1861 renamed the 42nd Bengal Native Infantry
  • 1864 renamed the 42nd (Assam) Bengal Native (Light) Infantry
  • 1885 became the 42nd (Assam) Bengal (Light) Infantry
  • 1886 became the 42nd Regiment of Goorkha Light Infantry
  • 1891 became the 42nd Gurkha (Rifle) Regiment of Bengal Infantry
  • 1901 became the 42nd Gurkha Rifles
  • 1903 became the 6th Gurkha Rifles
  • 1947 allocated to Britain on Partition
  • 1958 became the 6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles
  • 1994 amalgamated with the 1st Battalion, 2nd King Edward VII's Own Gurkha Rifles (The Sirmoor Rifles) to form the 1st Battalion, Royal Gurkha Rifles.

Regimental histories

  • Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles. Vol.1, 1817-1919 compiled by D.G.J. Ryan, G.C. Strahan, J.K. Jones. 1925. Available at the British Library UIN: BLL01011835772
Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles. Vol.2 1919-1948 by H.R.K. Gibbs. 1955. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01011835773
[Historical record of the 6th Gurkha Rifles]. Vol.3, The steadfast Gurkha : historical record of 6th Queen Elizabeth's Own Gurkha Rifles, 1948-1982 by Charles Messenger c 1985. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01011838612
  • Britain's Brigade of Gurkhas : the 2nd K.E.O. Goorkha Rifles, the 6th Q.E.O. Gurkha Rifles, the 7th D.E.O. Gurkha Rifles and the 10th P.M.O. Gurkha Rifles by E.D. Smith. Originally published 1973, and reprinted 1982. Series: Famous regiments. Available at the BL UIN: BLL01007379549

First World War

1/6th Gurkha Rifles
Regimental War Diaries are available from the National Archives, Kew, England. Note that many of these are hand written, however transcribed editions are available for Gallipoli, for the 6th Gurkha Rifles and for the 29th Indian Infantry Brigade, of which the 6th Gurkha Rifles was a part, edited by Martin Gillott. publisher Great War Diaries, in Kindle editions which have a Search facility (anyone with Kindle Unlimited can read them for free). (Download of a free Kindle App is available, you don't need Kindle).

2/6th Gurkha Rifles
In 1915, the 2/6th Gurkhas (2/6 GR) were part of the 3rd Infantry Brigade, in the 1st (Peshawar) Division, defending the border of North West Frontier from attack by various tribesmen including the Mohmands, the Bunerwals and the Swatis.[1] The 2/6th Gurkhas were deployed to Mesopotamia in March 1916. The Battalion War Diary for 2/6GR in the first few months in Mesopotamia records their marching from camp to camp up the Euphrates river from Basra to Nasiriyah, constantly working on maintaining the flood defences in this low-lying waterlogged area. It seems disease was a constant threat and they record an outbreak of cholera.[2]

For National Archives references, and Theatres of War, refer External Links below.

External Links

Historical books online

  • The Gurkhas 1928 Archive.org, mirror from Digital Library of India. Full title: The Gurkhas: their Manners, Customs and Country by Major W Brook Northey, late 1st KGO Gurkha Rifles and Captain C J Morris 3rd QAO Gurkha Rifles. Also available as a download from PAHAR Mountains of Central Asia Digital Dataset.
The Land Of The Gurkhas Or The Himalayan Kingdom Of Nepal by Major W Brook Northey, late 1st KGO Gurkha Rifles. Reprint edition, first published 1937. Archive.org. The author held the post of Recruiting Officer for five years, during which he was permitted to visit the interiors of Nepal that were out of bounds to other Europeans. Also available to download as a pdf from PAHAR-Mountains of Central Asia Digital Dataset.
  • The Gurkhas Archive.org version, mirror from Digital Library of India. A regimental history. This appears to be a reprint edition, for which no author is given, and which advises first published 1960. However the final chapter refers to events in 1964. The most likely publication appears to be The Gurkhas by Harold James and Denis Sheil-Small published 1965, London.
The Gurkhas by James, 1965. Link to a pdf download, PAHAR Mountains of Central Asia Digital Dataset.

References

  1. "GTG on the North West Frontier 1915" September 1, 2012. With photographs. Gill family’s service in the First World War. gillww1
  2. 2/6th Gurkha Rifles in Mesopotamia 1916 September 7, 2012. With photographs. Gill family’s service in the First World War. gillww1