Futwah-Islampur Light Railway

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Futwah-Islampur Light Railway
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Line of route
Futwah to Islampur
Gauge / mileage
2' 6" NG 27 miles (1943)
Timeline
1922 Line opened to traffic
1986 Nationalised, then closed, converted to broad gauge and re-opened to traffic
Key locations
Presidency Bengal
Stations Futwah, Islampur
System agency
Worked by Martin's Light Railways
Indian Railways
How to interpret this infobox

Spelling Note – Futwah was the earlier form of the town – later changed to Fatuha. Modern records refer to this railway as the ‘Fatuha-Islampur Light Railway’.

Fatuha-Islampur Light Railway

The Futwah-Islampur Light Railway (FILR) was a short 2ft 6in/762mm narrow gauge(NG) branchline located to the west of Bihar and the east of Patna. The line was authorised for construction in 1915 to connect Futwah to Islampur. [1].

The FILR opened in 1922. As a 2ft 6in NG line with a length of 40 miles (64 km). The railway ran parallel to road for almost its entire route [2].

The FILR was one of several small narrow gauge concerns constructed, owned and worked by Martin's Light Railways, a management company based in Calcutta.

At Futwah (Fatuha) there was an interchange with the mainline East Indian Railway

The railway operated independently until 1986 when it was taken over by Indian Railways and closed. Subsequently, the line has been converted to broad gauge and connects to the main Delhi line. [3]

Records

Refer to FIBIS Fact File #4: “Research sources for Indian Railways, 1845-1947” - available from the Fibis shop. This Fact File contains invaluable advice on 'Researching ancestors in the UK records of Indian Railways' with particular reference to the India Office Records (IOR) held at the British Library

An on-line search of the IOR records relating to this railway [4] gives the following: -

  • L/F/8/20/1709 “Futwah-Islampur Light Railway, Agreement for construction, maintenance and working of a railway from Futwah to Islampur; 1920”

Further Information

See Martin's Light Railways

References