Malacca

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Malacca was ceded to the British in the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1824 in exchange for Bencoolen on Sumatra. From 1826 to 1946 Malacca was governed, first by the British East India Company and then as a Crown Colony. It formed part of the Straits Settlements, together with Singapore and Penang (also known as Prince of Wales Island).

History

Malacca and the Spice Islands details military actions between the British and Dutch East India Companies at the end of the eighteenth century.

Battle of Soongei Pattye 1831
Battle of Kalama to Taboo 1832

Records

  • BACSA have published the book Malacca: Christian Cemeteries and Memorials by Alan Harfield, 2002 (revised edn). "From the Portuguese time in 1511, through the Dutch occupation 1641-1795 and from 1819-25 to the British period. Includes a short history with lists of churches and MIs; also an account of the local wars with lists of casualties in the Malayan Emergency. 214pp, 70 illustrations, 8 maps and plans"
For details including purchase, see BACSA Books - select Cemetery Record Books.
BACSA have put indexes to the majority of their cemetery books online and these indexes are free to search and browse, see the Fibiwiki page BACSA. If an indexed name is of interest then application can be made to BACSA for details of the relevant burial inscription - charges apply for this service.
  • FamilySearch have digitised the above BACSA book, which has restricted access, but which may be viewed on a FamilySearch computer at a FamilySearch Centre. Catalogue entry. For more information, see FamilySearch Centres. Update June 2018. It appears that FamilySearch digital viewing is no longer possible. To be clarified.
  • Ecclesiastical Returns: Baptisms, Marriages and Burials at the British Library. Prince of Wales Island [Penang], Malacca and Singapore 1799-1829 in IOR N/8. These records are included in the digitised records available on the commercial site findmypast
The LDS film number for these records is 498606, item 2.
Returns are continued in the Bengal returns 1830-1868, N/1. For Malacca marriages 1820-1824, see also IOR: R/9/39/3.
  • Malay documents in the Melaka Records in the British Library by Annabel Gallop
  • The National Archives of Malaysia (Arkib Negara Malaysia) in Kuala Lumpur holds the following records from Melaka (Malacca), held on microfilm at the National Archives.
    • Baptismal registers 1642-1825 of the Dutch Reformed Church.
      • These records are also available on FamilySearch microfilm, but are only available at the main FamilySearch Library, known as the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. (Kerkelijke registers, 1642-1825: catalogue entry which also includes limited marriage and death records from Arkib Negra Malaysia). The Family History Library is understood to have access to a complete microfilm collection, even though microfilms can no longer be ordered, so these microfilms should still be available there. (Currently (2017/12), these records have not been digitised, see FamilySearch Centres for details.)
      If you are able to visit the Family History Library in person, there are specialists available to assist, see Family History Library Research Specialists
      Should you wish to hire a researcher to access these records at the Family History Library, you may wish to discuss this, preferably by telephone, with the Family History Library, noting they are early Dutch records, (see FamilySearch Centres for details) or try contact through the Family History Library Facebook page.
      Reading Dutch Handwritten Records: 3 Lessons FamilySearch Learning Center/Lessons.
    • Marriage registers 1768-1838 and burial registers 1787-1827 from St Peter’s Roman Catholic Church[1]
  • Also see Dutch.

External links

Historical books online

References

  1. "Records in a Rival’s Repository: Archives of the Dutch East India Company" by Lennart Bes Itinerario, 31:3 (2007) pages 16-38, specifically page 31. Also see Arkib Negara Malaysia TANAP website.
  2. History of the Dutch in Malaysia by Dennis De Witt. Available at the British Library UIN: BLL01015564894