Scotland

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This article details connections between British India and Scotland.

Historical Background

A considerable number of Scots served in British India, a far greater number than would be expected based on the percentage of the Scottish population in Great Britain. See External links below, for a podcast which explains the historical background.

Some Scots are stated to have served with the Dutch East India Company.[1]

Early Regimental Influence

A number of Scottish regiments were serving in India by the late eighteenth century – for example the 42nd , 72nd, 73rd, 74th, 75th, 76th, 77th and 78th Regiments of Foot were all Highland Regiments recorded as being in India well before 1800.

Religious Influence

The influence of the Scottish Church in India was felt in Bombay as early as 1820 and soon spread to other areas. Many churches and cemeteries in India evidence a strong Scottish presence. For example, Church of Scotland Burials in Assam.

Industries

Scotsmen formed the backbone of many industries and, in particular, those associated with planting – eg . Jute, Indigo and Tea. In fact, it was a Scotsman, Robert Bruce, who discovered the first tea in Assam in 1823.

Moreover, the climate of the hill station of Coorg, towards Bangalore has encouraged its nickname as the Scotland of India. This is a region also known for its tea and coffee plantations.

Useful Databases Online

If your ancestors went out to India from Scotland then there are many online resources to assist in tracing background. Some of these are mentioned below:-

Fibis Resources

  • The Scots Overseas from the book of the same name, a referenced list of men and women who emigrated or adventured to British India compiled by David Dobson.

India Related Links

  • National Archives of Scotland have a free searchable index revealing many records of interest to the British India family historian. – copies of the actual records may be obtained from the Archives. For example, a search of the online catalogue under reference GD51/4 throws up an index of almost 1,700 entries relating to persons applying for positions with the East India Company between 1781and 1830– with a note of patronage. These persons can also be found by an individual name search in the catalogue.
The National Archives of Scotland is now part of the National Records of Scotland, see link below.

General Links

Some records from National Records of Scotland, see below, are available on FamilySearch catalogued as "Microfilm of original records ... in the New Register House, Edinburgh". These are mainly catalogued as Old parochial registers [OPR], parish registers or blotter registers. There are also some records catalogued from National Archives of Scotland. Currently (2020/04/10) these records are catalogued as available only at FamilySearch Family History Centres. although previously they appear to have been also viewable at FS Affiliate Libraries.
FamilySearch Digital Library contains Smith's inventory of genealogical sources : Scotland in 34 volumes c 1994, with most volumes covering a different county. To view, you need to be signed into FamilySearch. A description in the first volume states "The Inventory provides a locator for items within printed and unpublished material. For example, there are many historical society publications, serials, and periodicals that deal with a variety of subjects. ...The Inventory is designed to bring to light some of the valuable articles hidden within these sources which are not well known to the amateur genealogist. ...The cut-off date for material in this Inventory is December 1989." List of Subjects covered Volume 1, pages 8-12.
The Scottish Genealogy Society located in Edinburgh.

External links

  • "Scotland’s Empire: The Scots in British India" (scroll down) by Sir Tom Devine. BACSA podcast of a lecture 8 April 2019. "Scotland’s most distinguished historian Sir Tom Devine considers the role of Scots in India in administration, the military and trade with special reference to the period from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries. Among the themes examined are the scale of Scottish ‘colonisation’ of the East India Company, the reasons for this and the impact of the India connection on Scotland itself. Sir Tom Devine is Professor Emeritus in History at the University of Edinburgh. His books include To the Ends of the Earth: Scotland’s Global Diaspora, The Scottish Nation 1700–2000 and Scotland’s Empire.
  • The Tiger and the Thistle Website project focusing on Tipu Sultan and the Scots in India, 1760-1800, now an archived website.
  • A social and domestic history of the kilted and Highland Based Regiments of Foot, 1820-1920 by D M Henderson [Diana Mary] 1986 PhD Doctor of Philosophy Thesis, University of Edinburgh.

Historical books online

References

  1. "Migration from Scotland before 1700" by David Dobson
 November 2015. st-andrews.ac.uk. Includes a very brief statement "Scots soldiers and sailors served in the armies of the Netherlands and in their fleets, as well as those of the Dutch East India Company … in the Early Modern Period."